Tag Archives: Learning Design

At a recent e-Learning Network event we had an interesting challenge set by Alan Nelson from Nelson Croom on educating colour blindness and genetics.

This led me to further thinking on what might be having an affect that I hadn’t considered. It turns out there’s a surprising number of adults with undiagnosed sensory ‘distortions’ that can interfere with their ability to learn, and I’ve become much more sensitive to developing learning content that is accessible to people with these differences – things like dyslexia and colour blindness.

Researching the topic led me to a couple of resources to share.

This video does a great job of explaining what’s going on with Dyslexia:

And here’s a typical business red, amber, green report as seen through the eyes of someone with the most common form of colour blindness, Deuteranomaly.

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And the same report when viewed with normal colour vision.

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I made these images using a simple extension for the Chrome web browser, which does a good job of simulating how things look. Click the image below for the extension.

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To conclude; a few simple rules covering things like layout, fonts and colour, can help make learning content easier to access. I guess the fairly obvious way to sign out this post; the benefit of making content easy to access for those with sensory differences is that you end up making it easier for everyone.

Thank you to the ELN for a great event and Alan for posing the challenge.

Simple, stylish, short video based learning from the Open University.

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This is a series of short animations that introduce six key design movements, from Gothic Revival to Postmodernism. It makes a great case for simple, short, video based learning. With the inclusion of a diagnostic test to understand your design preferences adding that extra bit of learner engagement. Really love the simplicity and presentation.

It was put together by Clive Hilton at the Open University.