Category Archives: Instructional Design

Stylish use of long scroll for learning content

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Journey to the Centre of the Earth

How far would you have to travel to reach the Earth’s core? And what would you see along the way? Discover what lies beneath…

Really stylish example of long scroll to deliver learning content. Via BBC

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How To Teach Adults by Dan Spalding (free download)

Screen Shot 2015-04-18 at 09.19.04Interesting Boingboing.net article by Cory Doctorow discussing “How to Teach Adults: Get a Job; Plan Your Class; Teach Your Students; Change the World.

Dan Spalding’s How to Teach Adults (free download) is an extraordinary document that mixes the practical and the philosophical, a book that explains how to be a better teacher, and how better teachers make a better world.

I first encountered How to Teach Adults as a kickstarter for a free online doc, back in 2012. I remember thinking that it was well-written, cogent and very practical.”

Gameplay as an introduction to data mining and taxonomy

Google Feud is an interesting online game using Google autocomplete. It is a good way to open a discussion into data mining and taxonomy.

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The game, by developer Justin Hook , is fun and surprisingly addictive. It harnesses the mystery of Google’s autocomplete search function, asking players to choose the next word in a broad query such as ‘Google…’ or ‘I love my…’, the game gives users three chances to complete the leader board, giving a big X with every wrong answer.

What’s interesting about this game is the ease with which it could be used for data mining. If the guesses are recorded and sorted by frequency, it could supply huge amounts of useful data; all from real people, giving their best guesses.

Sorting this data using techniques like those used in taxonomy and cladistics could reveal results to improve future search or autocomplete suggestions. I guess it’s a fairly safe bet Google do this type of thing, and much more, with their search data already.

Now imagine an online retailer selling thousands of products. If data is mined from the searches customers type, rather than from the point of sale, useful information could be gained to reveal the ‘real world’ language customers use to describe what they want. For example imagine two different customers entering a search, one uses ‘laptop bag’, the other ‘laptop case’, would you expect them to get the same products displayed? Or customers searching for ‘lightbulbs’ when the retailer has what they want all categorised as ‘lamps’. Change the categorisation to match the search term frequency and it’s fair to say sales will likely increase. And searches that give a zero return would reveal what a customer wants to buy that the retailer doesn’t stock.

A final thought. Here’s a different, and equally fun online game. Anton Wallén has created GeoGuessr, an experimental game that drops players into a location in Google Street View and challenges them to guess where in the world they’re located.

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Could useful data be mined out of it?

 

 

 

Unpicking the instructional design in Google Primer

 

PrimerCover (1)Nice example from the Learning and Development Centre of Excellence demonstrating ‘unpicking’ the instruction design in Primer a new iOS App from Google. Thank you LDCOE.

Neat example of product explainer

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Really nice example of a web animated product explainer, using the technique of exploded view drawing, a graphic invention from the renaissance.

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A nearly 600 year old approach is used because it does such a good job of telling a story in a simple way.

Thoughts on what we mean by eLearning from Atticmedia’s Matthew Fletcher

http://atticmedia.com/a-broader-view-of-elearning/

Interesting news bulletin from Atticmedia’s Director of Strategy, Matthew Fletcher. He shares some thoughts on extending the scope of what we mean by eLearning.

Neat new (and free) ebook from the eLearning Network

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For the past four years, the eLearning Network has asked members to submit their tips in the run up to Christmas. These appear on the ELN Insights blog. Now Mark and Sarah Berthelemey have reviewed the last four year’s worth of material, and pulled together the most useful of them into a freely-downloadable ebook: Elearning tips from the pros

Thank you Mark and Sarah and all the experts who have kindly given their time, and knowledge for our benefit.

Disclosure: I am a member of the eLearning Network, having joined to advance my knowledge and expertise as a content creator. I can highly recommend their mentor programme and networking events.